Abandonment Issues In Your Business

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They say the fortune is in the follow-up. They’d be right.
80% of sales require 5 follow-up calls after the meeting. 44% of sales reps give up after 1 follow-up. – The Brevet Group

Those who don’t follow up are leaving 80% of their sales behind.

Think about that

Those who don’t follow up are leaving 80% of their sales behind. To me, the worst part about leaving deals behind is not that you are letting your competition come behind you and enjoy the benefits of the work you just did, although that is quite disappointing. The worst part is what happens to those prospects that your competition doesn’t reach out to. These are people and businesses that are abandoned by your lack of follow-up. They are left without guidance and are likely to find themselves settling for the same level of struggle they’ve always had.

Why keep struggling?

You see, many people, especially business owners, feel that sales are something that they have to do. For many, selling is the least favorite part of running their business. This disenchantment is in part due to their feeling or belief that making sales means somehow forcing what they’re offering onto somebody.

The truth is sales is service. And although many people have different beliefs around the idea of selling, I learned from my good friend Jim Padilla that the goal of sales should be simply to help somebody make a decision. A decision either to be okay with the current circumstances or a decision to change them. The decision does not necessarily have to be buying your product. As sales professionals, and if you are reading this article, you are indeed a sales professional, you have the power to change lives. You can transform businesses. You can help move somebody from a level of default in their life, one that just comes from your surroundings and circumstances, not one that you intentionally choose to make a specific choice to design or create your reality.

Being great at selling is a superpower

And like Peter Parker’s Uncle, Ben said, “With great power comes great responsibility.” Often, we look at this phrase and lean into the idea that we shouldn’t use that power for evil. I’d like to challenge that. Even worse than using your power for evil is not using your power at all.

If you have a product or a service that can have a positive impact on somebody’s life, it is your job, your duty, your responsibility to do everything you can to share it with them. You must help people learn about what it is you offer and help them understand how it solves a problem they have. They may not choose to buy your product, but if you are good at sales, you can help them choose themselves and whatever the right decision is for them at any given moment.

Don’t sideline yourself because you have some fear around being “salesy”. Take ownership of the strength you have, the gifts that you can share, and tell the world how you can help them.

Jeremy DeMerchant

Jeremy DeMerchant

Jeremy DeMerchant is a #1 best-selling author, award-winning speaker, and creator of the Momentum 120 Sales Accelerator. Jeremy founded Permission To Sell Consulting Group after two decades of sales and leadership roles for industry giants in telecom, finance and education.

http://www.permissiontosell.com/

Jeremy DeMerchant

Jeremy DeMerchant

Jeremy DeMerchant is a #1 best-selling author, award-winning speaker, and creator of the Momentum 120 Sales Accelerator. Jeremy founded Permission To Sell Consulting Group after two decades of sales and leadership roles for industry giants in telecom, finance and education.

http://www.permissiontosell.com/

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