Becoming A Recovery Coach

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In 2004 I attended a training to become an addiction counselor. It was the training I always wanted to attend ever, since I started my journey recovering from alcohol addiction back in 2002.

I attended my training in the Netherlands where twice a week, we would go to the red light district to serve and connect with men and women who worked there. It was a life-changing experience for me.

I dreamed that after I became an addiction counselor, I’d be able to better serve, and facilitate in the transformations of those who struggled with compulsive behaviors.

And then graduation day came…

Wellness

Taking a turn to coaching

I discovered that even though I had received the best education on working with people who struggled with addiction, I was only a Level 1 certified addiction counselor. This meant that I couldn’t actually counsel anyone without the supervision of a more qualified professional. It felt like my dream had been shattered! I had an option though. I could go ahead and train as a psychologist… But I had two psychologist friends. They were the very worst at counseling or helping anyone go through any challenge. They were really good at quoting Sigmund Freud. I hated it! I decided I was not going to spend 4 years getting a bachelor’s degree in psychology.

Declaring myself a recovery coach

In 2010, out of the blue, I started calling myself a recovery coach. I thought I had invented a new niche! I was now Brian the recovery coach! That way, I could do counseling, and not be regulated by anyone!

Help me

Then in 2011, while I was on staff on an addiction counselor training program in Switzerland, I met an actual recovery coach. She was great at her job, and she wasn’t even practicing counseling! She told me about the organization from which she had received her training. The NET Institute.

Determined to be a coach

Fast forward to 2015, I applied to get trained as a recovery life coach at the NET Institute. The training cost around a whopping $3500 which I didn’t have. I really wanted to get this training from them because their organization was famous for offering the best addiction and recovery education.

So this is what I did: I asked for a 100% scholarship! And they told me they didn’t have any. And because I was determined to learn from the best, I asked for a scholarship again! And they told me they didn’t have any. And because I was determined, you know what I did? I emailed them twice per week from December 2015 until they finally awarded me the scholarship in April 2016. Yes! I was finally accepted in April 2016. The training would have taken me 4 months, but

I took it in one year.

I trained first as a life coach, then as a recovery coach.
Now I serve as a recovery coach, supporting men and women who struggle with compulsive behaviors such as overeating, gambling and hypersexuality to stop their addictions and prevent relapse long term.

The bar for entry into the coaching industry is very low, and as I see it, for now (July 2020), because the coaching industry is not regulated, anyone and everyone can pretty much call themselves a coach! It is almost embarrassing for me to introduce myself to anyone as a coach. That’s now a code word for “out of work” or “jobless”.

How I’m navigating the Coaching Industry

The upside of being a coach is that the bar of entry is low, and the downside is that it has become a joke! Everyone is a coach. Especially during the period of the 2020 COVID19 lockdown, there was a flood of six figure coaches who appeared out of nowhere!

Because the coaching industry has such a low standard, it also serves me very well in that whenever I’m in a coaching relationship with anyone, I stay alert in serving them with my best. That way, when someone experiences coaching with me, they will experience the difference.

Brian Mulipah

Brian Mulipah

Netherlands
Many men and women who struggle with compulsive behaviors such as overeating, gambling, and hypersexuality want to stop using, but they can't. Brian Mulipah is the recovery strategist who helps them stop their addictions and prevent relapse long term.

www.tovnation.com

Brian Mulipah

Brian Mulipah

Netherlands
Many men and women who struggle with compulsive behaviors such as overeating, gambling, and hypersexuality want to stop using, but they can't. Brian Mulipah is the recovery strategist who helps them stop their addictions and prevent relapse long term.

www.tovnation.com

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