Unpacking Suitcases

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suitcases

So, there I was, yet again, surrounded by suitcases. Was I really going to unpack them all again? Nah, time to throw caution to the wind. My inner hoarder was horrified yet my bourgeoning kinesiologist was bursting to be set free. It was finally time to live my best life. My role was changing. The kids were grown. I was no longer anyone’s wife or partner. My job had disappeared along with said partner. I thought I might have been more terrified than I was. Progress, at last!
Finally, it was time I asked myself:

What does it mean to be a kinesiologist?

Firstly, a commitment to be of service to others is paramount. Secondly, being prepared to work on one’s “stuff” consciously and consistently is a must. And, finally, having confidence in oneself and one’s ability is of great importance. I had already learned how to stop apologising for spending so much time and resources to become a kinesiologist. I had already learned that I no longer needed to give away sessions to prove my worth. I had already learned that I had a knack for finding a decent, clear indicator muscle. So, what came next? Gradually, giving a talk here and there, turning up to shows, being on call for other kinesiologists who wanted to go on holiday or to lessen their workload. I was there. Everything pertaining to my therapy was portable. I could parcel “my trade” into the back of the car and, upon arrival, be fully functional as a clinic within 30 minutes. For some strange reason I worked far, far away from my home. I would pack up for a week here or a month there, living out of suitcases. I guess I did not want to be tied to any one place for a while. And, if I am honest, it was an exhausting time in my life.

A Kinesiologist At Work

desk view If you have never seen a kinesiologist at work, then let me paint you a picture. You will see a lot of books and manuals being opened and closed in quick succession, sheets of paper and charts aflutter, tuning forks, lights, colour discs, flash cards, vials of various sorts, crystals, essences and oils, a lot of under the breath muttering, and the occasional clear question directed towards a client – if they’re not already in a deeply relaxed state and processing the energy shifts. It is a busy modality for the therapist and the client. Muscle monitoring is constant. Perhaps, as the field of energy medicine and energy work evolves, the need to always be in physical contact with a client will diminish. If you are interested to read up on the history of kinesiology you can check out the following link: https://www.nkinstitute.com.au/history-of-kinesiology.html

Modalities of Kinesiology

I am a proud graduate of Hugo Tobar’s NK Institute. There are so many notable registered training organisations and so many forms of energy kinesiology. However, I found Neuroenergetic Kinesiology to be an elegant, intelligent form of the modality. Initially, I learned the Touch For Health programme. As I said in an earlier article, I had to repeat it once because of my rabbithole-diving nature. And once again, because of my stick-poking nature. Then I moved onto Richard Utt’s Agape quest; followed by a quick sashay across to LEAP and Charles Kreb’s work.

classroom

During this time, the Australian Kinesiology Association was trying to develop continuity, standards, and guidelines for the kinesiology community. It was agreed that the minimum standard for practice was a diploma from a recognised training organisation. Hugo worked diligently to develop his principles of kinesiology in a well thought out and structured manner for a Certificate IV qualification. Add to this, Brain Formatting, Neuro-Emotional Programming, and a few other programmes that Hugo has developed and, voila, his diploma programme was up and running. For me, the timing was perfect.

There were always mutterings that all kinesiologists should have an underpinning science degree. Probably, since Applied Kinesiology (the chiropractic kind) is a postgraduate programme, some of the energy kinesiologists’ associations were looking for similar guidelines and requirements. As the years went by, I developed more skills, mainly fuelled by the need to accrue continuing professional development points to stay affiliated and registered.

If I had my time over again would I do things differently, knowing what I know now? Maybe, maybe not. Are we there yet? Let us find out next month.

Anne Brewer

Anne Brewer

Registered kinesiologist, RAW practitioner, CEC, Storyteller. Soon I’ll add some more alphabet letters to my name because I love to learn and share.

https://www.facebook.com/anne.brewerhanson

Anne Brewer

Anne Brewer

Registered kinesiologist, RAW practitioner, CEC, Storyteller. Soon I’ll add some more alphabet letters to my name because I love to learn and share.

https://www.facebook.com/anne.brewerhanson

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